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Story News: Experts have warned that the stories children tell are almost always boring, long winded and without any kind of satisfactory conclusion.

“When children tell adults anecdotes about their lives, they often start out well,” said Dr. Robert McKee of the Institute of Linguistic Studies in Southern California.

“But all too quickly the child loses any sense of pace or narrative structure. What began as a promising story about the time they had an ice cream in the park typically falls down flat during the middle of the second act.”

“All the tension and any potential for a character arc is gone – the audience becomes bored and restless, then the child will inevitably – and abruptly – stop the story with some kind of unsatisfactory conclusion such as ‘and I really liked it’.”

“Children really need to master their sense of dramatic structure before boring adults with trite observations about their unremarkable little lives.”

Story: Simon Swatman

 

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